Chuck Barris

Celebrity Information | Olivia Miller

Jun 3, 2021

American television producer and host Chuck Barris celeb networth who created the iconic 1960s game shows The Dating Game and The Newlywed Game but was perhaps best remembered as the creator and host of the comic talent show The Gong Show, which originally aired from 1976 to 1978. He was also a songwriter who wrote "Palisades Park" recorded by Freddy Cannon. Barris wrote an autobiography titled Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, which was made into the film of the same name and directed by George Clooney. Chuck Barris became a public figure in 1976 when he produced and served as the host of the talent show spoof The Gong Show, which he packaged in partnership with television producer Chris Bearde. The show's cult following has endured, though it ran only two seasons on NBC (1976–78) and four in syndication (1976–80). As with some of Barris' other projects (including The Newlywed Game), it was at one point possible to see The Gong Show twice daily, a relatively uncommon feat in the years prior to cable TV's expansion into the commercial market. Barris' jokey, bumbling personality; his accentuated hand-clapping between sentences (which eventually had the studio audience joining in with him); and his catchphrases (he would usually go into commercial break with, "We'll be right back with more er ... STUFF ...", occasionally paired with shifting his head to reveal the ubiquitous sign behind the stage reading simply "STUFF", and "This is me saying 'bye'" was one of his favorite closing lines) were the antithesis of the smooth TV host (such as Gary Owens, who hosted the syndicated version in its first season). Barris joined in with the eccentricity of the format, using unusual props, dressing in colorful and somewhat unusual clothing (such as strange hats pulled over his head, if not his eyes), he became yet another performer of the show, and for many viewers, quite a cult hero. Dubbed "Chuckie Baby" by his fans, Barris was a perfect fit with the show's goofy, sometimes wild amateur performers and its panel of three judges (including regulars Jamie Farr, Jaye P. Morgan, and Arte Johnson). In addition, there was a growing "cast of characters", including an NBC stage carpenter who played "Father Ed," a priest who would get flustered when his cue cards were deliberately turned upside-down; stand-up comedian Murray Langston, who as "The Unknown Comic" wore a paper bag over his head (with cut-outs for his eyes, mouth, and even a box of Kleenex), and "Gene Gene the Dancing Machine" (Gene Patton), arguably the most popular member of the "cast", the show's stagehand, who would show up and dance whenever the band played the song "Jumpin' at the Woodside". In the early 1980s, Patton was even pointed out by tour guides of incoming NBC tours as his onscreen character, while at the same time adhering to his more typical off-camera work duties.

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Olivia Miller

A normal person who is tired of this world.