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by Harry
Korean Food - Beef (In Progress)

(The following text is referenced from "Beef" by - Amos Farooqi)   Hello, I am back this time to tell you some of the major food componenets of Korean food, starting from beef, pork, chicken, and ending with seafood. Although the staple part of any Korean meal is rice, people eat rice with side, or main dishes, and it is common to see any forms of meat as part of the dish.         Korean Cuisine - Beef   Beef is actually a relatively recent addition to common Korean cuisine. Cows in the past, were an integral part of the agricultural workforce, thus, beef consumption was confined to once-in-a-lifetime special occasions such as weddings. As Korea's economy grew, beef became a common part of the average Korean's diet, but the price of beef remains high compared to other countries due to high import costs, and low domestic production.   The most expensive, and arguably the best quality among Korean beef is Hanwoo, Korea's indigenous cow. Hanwoo contains a lot of Oleic acid which makes the meat more savory and chewy, while others say that Hanwoo is raised using a special method to make it more suitable for Korean dishes. Thus, some foreigners may be disappointed when eating hanwoo due to its rough texture.         Guide to beef cuts:    Part  Description  Dishes  Moksim (Chunk Roll) Chewy, and abundant in gelatin   Steak, Barbeque  Deungshim (Sirloin)  Soft, and juicy  Steak, Barbeque  Chaekkeut (Loin End)  Tender and moderately blended with fat  Steak, Barbeque  Anshim (Tender Loin)  The most tender part of beef, low fat content  Steak, Barbeque  Woodun (Top round cap)  Smooth texture with low fat Marinated dish, bulgogi, beef jerky ‌Seoldo (Bottom round) ‌Muscle, chewy Bulgogi, beef jerky, Yukhwe (Raw Beef) ‌Galbi (Ribs) Tender, Moderately blended with fat ‌Barbeque, Marinated dish ‌Yangji (Brisket) ‌Chewy due to connective tissues Soup, Stew, Marinated dish ‌Satae (Shin foreshank) Tough, dry, low in fat ‌Soup, Stew, Marinated dish ‌Apdari (Bolar blade) Soft, but dry ‌Soup, Stew, Yukhwe, Marinated dish   1. Galbi / Sutbulgalbigui   (Photo from Korea Tourism Organization) Galbi is a perfect combination of juicy meat and sweet soy sauce, deepened by a smoky charcoal flavor. Traditionally the marinade was made from Korean soy sauce, but nowadays, many restaurants come up with their original recipies Almost all Korean BBQ restaurants that serve galbi, will use Sutbul, a charcoal grill. The taste of the galbi depends on the freshness of the meat, the sauce but also the charcoal grill, which gives a rich flavor that you cannot get from a normal steel grill. You can also get Saenggalbi, which is non-marinated galbi.   Where to eat?   - Nowadays, you can easily find galbi or beef barbeque restaurants all over Korea. Marinated galbi is believed to have emerged in Suwon, in the Gyeonggi-do province. During the Chosun Dynasty, Suwon was the center of commerce in Korea, and galbi was a symbol of wealth. Suwon is famous for its Wanggalbi, which means King galbi, and you can eat galbi a size up to 15 cm long!  - Other famous areas for galbi are Pocheon (also in the Gyeonggi Province), and Busan, with their own Haeundae-galbi. - Prices will range about an average from 40,000 KRW ~ 45,000 KRW (per 100 g) for a hanwoo marinated short rib   --- 2. Deungshim or Kkot Deungshim   Koreans generally prefer the fat to be evenly distributed on their beef. Sirloin, with the evenly distributed fat, is called Kkot Deungshim. Kkot means flower in Korean, and you can see the white fat among the red flesh that resembles flowers, hence is why it is called Kkot Deungshim. This part of beef is extremely popular alongside galbi, and is one of the most expensive beef cuts. It's full of flavor, and melts away in the mouth, making it irresistable.    Where to eat?   - Similar to galbi, you can find restaurants that serve deungshim, and kkot deungshim all over Korea. One place you can try out is Majangdong Butcher Market, and the Food Alley inside. It serves good, fresh quality meat at reasonable prices. Majangdong can be accessed by the Seoul Subway, at Majang Station (Line 5), or by the City Bus.   - Prices will average ranging from 48,000 ~ 52000 KRW for a normal Hanwoo sirloin (per 100 g), and 60,000 + KRW for a normal Hanwoo prime sirloin (kkot deungshim, per 100 g).     3. Bulgogi   (Photo by Korea Tourism Organization) Bulgogi is one of the most famous Korean dishes, commonly made by stir-frying thin slices of beef marinated in sweet soy-based sauce. There are different recipes for bulgogi that vary by region. The taste is similar to the marinated taste of galbi, but bulgogi is much thinner, and is served without the bone.     There are several different styles of bulgogi:   1) Grilled Bulgogi:  - Marinated Beef / Bulgogi grilled on charcoal   2) Gwangyang Bulgogi: - Gwangyang is a district in Jeollanamdo province, and the bulgogi are marinated in a mixture of soy sauce, fruit puree, sugar and other spices, which is then grilled over a charcoal fire. The meat is marinated just before being grilled.   3) 

May 22, 2019
by Visit Korea - Korea Tourism Organization
Tips for Vegetarians in Korea - Part 2

      -- Vegetarian Cuisine in Korea (Part 2)-- By Korea Tourism Organization   In Part 2, we will be notifying you of key vegetarian restaurants across Seoul, Korea. They are all reasonably priced, and foreigner-friendly.   ---   1. Plant   - Plant serves meals and desserts that are made without using any eggs, milk, and butter. It was a cafe, but now it is also serving vegetarian dishes and meals. It is not only popular among vegetarians, but also recommended among international tourists in general. There are two store locations, both which are located in Itaewon Station (Line 6)   Address: 2F, 117, Bogwang-ro, Yongsan-gu, Seoul (서울특별시 용산구 보광로 117) Directions: Itaewon Station (Seoul Subway Line 6), Exit 4. Walk approx. 5 min. Operating hours: Monday-Saturday 11:00—22:00 / Friday-Saturday 11:00-22:00 / Closed Sundays Inquiries: +82-2-749-1981 (Korean, English) Website: www.plantcafeseoul.com (Korean only)     2.  Around Green   - Around Green is the hottest vegan restaurant in Mangwon-dong. The restaurant menus fit for vegetarians such as sandwich, tofu topping rice, and curry. The most popular menu is the black bean steak, made from substitute meat using organic black beans, topped with vegan demi-glace sauce.   Address: 47, Poeun-ro 5-gil, Mapo-gu, Seoul (서울특별시 마포구 포은로5길 47) Directions: Mangwon Station (Seoul Subway Line6), Exit 2. Walk for approx. 15 min. Operating hours: Monday-Saturday 12:00-21:00 (Break time 15:00-17:00) / Closed Sundays Inquiries: +82-2-6080-9797 (Korean, English) Instagram: @around_green (Korean only)   3. Slunch   - Slunch is a vegetarian friendly café and a restaurant. Their menu provides ingredient information along with vegetarian classification, allowing any vegetarian to choose the menu conveniently according to their dietary preference.   Address: 38, Wausan-ro 3-gil, Mapo-gu, Seoul (서울특별시 마포구 와우산로3길 38) Directions: Sangsu Station (Seoul Subway Line 6), Exit 3. Walk for approx. 10 min. Operating hours: 11:00-01:00 Inquiries: +82-2-6367-9870 (Korean, English, Japanese) Website: www.slunch.co.kr (Korean only)   4. Osegyehyang   - Owned by vegetable grocery store Veggie Food, Osegyehyang has been serving vegetarian food for over 10 years at Insa-dong. The greatest draw of this restaurant is the diverse variety of menus.    Directions: Anguk Station (Seoul Subway Line 3), Exit 6. Walk for approx. 5 min. Operating hours: 11:30-21:00 (Break time: Weekdays 15:30-17:00 / Weekends 16:00-17:00) Inquiries: +82-2-735-7171 (Korean, English, Chinese) Website: www.go5.co.kr (Korean)     5. Loving Hut Cafe   - Loving Hut Cafe is aprt of the international vegetarian chain restaurant Loving Hut. From meals, to desserts, the cafe offers a wide variety of menu that is 100% vegan. A total of 15 cafes are spread throughout Korea, namely in Seoul, Gyeonggi-do, Daejeon and Jeonju. You can find more information on each branch locations at the official website.   Address (main branch): 35, Gaepo-ro 22-gil, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (서울특별시 강남구 개포로22길 35) Directions: Yangje Station (Seoul Subway Line 3, Shinbundang Line), Exit 5. Take Bus Gangnam 02 and get off at Kookmin Bank Green Park Bus Stop. Walk for approx. 5 min. Operating hours: 11:00-21:00 Inquiries: +82-2-576-2158 (Korean, English) Website: www.lovinghut.kr (Korean, English)   You can check out our site for additional details and information.   Also, feel free to contact us on our SNS such as Facebook or Instagram if you have any questions or concerns about Korea.

May 22, 2019
by Visit Korea - Korea Tourism Organization
Tips for Vegetarians in Korea - Part 1

      -- Vegetarian Cuisine in Korea (Part 1)-- By Korea Tourism Organization   As the number of foreigners and visitors increase in Korea, so have the travelers' expectations for food due to the increasing diversity of dietary options and health concerns. Recently, the number of vegetarian, and religious dietary cuisine options have been increasing in Korea to match this changing trends. In general throughout the world, several restaurants and cafes make efforts to come up with vegetarian-friendly menus to meet the customer's needs. Vegetarians can be categorized into eight different types, ranging from vegans, who abstain from all animal-based products, and flexitarians, who occasionally consume meat.    We will provide you a brief guide on how to enjoy Vegetarian cuisine in Korea, along with some recommendations and locations.   ---   | Tips on Ordering a Menu   Unless you are going for a vegetarian-only restaurant, a majority of Korean restaurants do not have a set procedure or a manual for those who have dietary restrictions. Vegetarian travelers are advised to ask the staff upon entry about vegetarian options, or to inform the staff of their diet, and provide detailed instructions on what ingredients to exclude upon making the order.   1. Korean Cuisine (Some Examples)   Bibimbap:  - As the basic ingredients include meat, egg and gochujang (chili paste), when ordering, ask the staff to check if you can have the meat and egg removed from the dish. You can eat the bibimbap with just the vegetables and the sauce which will still taste great. Stew/Soup/Jjigae/Porridge - Many traditional Korean stews, and soup dishes are made from meat or fish broth. Even Jjigaes such as Kimchi Jjigae, though it does not have meat, may have a meat-based soup. You could try making a request to prepare your order using plain water. For porridge dishes, you can easily request to exclude meat and seafood upon order.   Gimbap: - Ham and eggs are basic ingredients that go in a gimbap, while other ingredient options include tuna or crab stick. Make sure to double check the ingredients before consumption.     2. Western Cuisine (Some Examples)   Hamburgers:  - Unfortunately burgers in Korea are not much different from those overseas, and there are some restaurants that serve hamburgers using patties made from grains and vegetables instead of meat.   Pasta: - Most restaurants serve pastas with meat or seafood ingredients, and sometimes the sauce themselves (even if it's tomato sauce) may have a meat-base ingredient mixed. Make sure to ask and check with the staff in advance   Pizza: - Similar to Pasta, the topping or the topping sauce may have meat-based ingredients mixed. There are several vegetarian pizza menus such as basil pesto pizza, or tortilla pizza.     3. Chinese Cuisine   Jjajangmyeong, Jjamppong:  - Jjajangmyeon's basic ingredients include pork, whereas jjampong uses seafood. You can make a request to exclude any meat or seafood, and add only vegetables instead.   Dim sum / dumplings: - Dim sum, and dumplings are filled with either seafood or meat. Though it will be difficult, as most of the dumpling meat base will be pre-made, you can request the staff to exclude meat upon order.     4. Japanese Cuisine:   Curry: - Similar to Pasta, even vegetable curry options can include cheese or cream. Always ask the staff beforehand about the ingredients.   Sushi: - You could inform the staff of your vegetarian diet and ask for recommendations, but it will be difficult as the main ingredient is seafood.   --- Final Remark/Tips: - If you can find the number of the restaurant, make sure to call them beforehand to ask for vegetarian options. This is because most Korean restaurants pre-make and prepare beforehand their ingredients, so asking them to remove certain ingredients on the spot may make it difficult.  Nevertheless, there are special, and popular vegetarian restaurants in Korea, that are also popular among locals and tourists. We will continue in Part 2!   You can check out our site for additional details and information.   Also, feel free to contact us on our SNS such as Facebook or Instagram if you have any questions or concerns about Korea.    

May 21, 2019
by Visit Korea - Korea Tourism Organization
General Kinds of Korean Food

  -- General Kinds of Food in Korea -- By Korea Tourism Organization   For this blog post, we will be giving you a brief overview of what to expect of Korean dishes, Korean food when you come visit Korea. Note that there are so much more variations and combinations of food and ingredients, than simply what is presented in this post.   | Main Dishes |   1. Bap (Rice)   - Bap, a staple of Korean food, is steamed rice. There are many kinds of bap depending on the ingredients such as huinbap (white rice); japgokbap (rice with barley, millet, and beans); byeolmibap (rice with vegetables, seafood and meat); and bibimbap (rice mixed with namul and beef).   2. Juk (Porridge)   - Juk is one of the Korean dishes that was developed in early times. It consists of grains simmered for a long time with 5 to 7 times the volume of water. Juk is usually served to patients and eaten for health.   3. Guksu (Noodles)   - Korean noodles are made by kneading wheat flour or buckwheat flour and drawing the dough into long coils. There are many varieties of noodle dishes ranging from hot to cold, and combined with other ingredients. ---   | Side Dishes |   1. Guk (Soup)   - Guk is a soup of vegetables, seafood and/or meats boiled in plenty of water. Some varieties are malgeun-jangguk (clear soy sauce soup), tojangguk (soybean paste soup), gomguk (rich beef soup) and naengguk (chilled soup). The standard Korean table setting always has bap and guk.   2. Jjigae (Stew)   - Jjigae has less water and more solid ingredients than soup, and it is saltier. Varieties include malgeun-jjigae (clear jjigae), toenjang-jjigae (soybean paste jjigae), and kimchi jjigae   3. Jeongol (Hot Pot)   - Jeongol started as a royal court food. It consists of meat, seafood, mushrooms and vegetables simmered in broth at the table just before serving as a dish. It has become less common now due to the prevalence of other Hot Pot dishes or Shabu Shabu.    4. Jjim (Steamed Dish)   - Jjim is a dish of main ingredients cooked with seasonings in deep water. It may be boiled with soup just above the solid ingredients, or steamed. An example is Kimchi-jjim, with boiled pork and a kimchi-based broth.   5. Jorim (Braised dish)   - Jorim is a cooking method to braise meat, seafood or vegetables with soy sauce or red pepper paste on low heat. The ingredients are cooked for a long time to allow the flavors to seep in. An example is Galchi-jorim, similar to a Jjim dish, has minimal soup.   6. Bokkeum (Stir-fried dish)   - Bokkeum is a stir-fry of meats, seafood or vegetables. There are two types of bokkeum dishes; one is just stir-fried in an oiled frying pan, the other one is stir-fried with soy sauce and sugar. A popular example is Jeyuk Bokkeum   7. Gui (Grilled dish)   - Gui is a dish of grilled meats, seafood or vegetables as is, or grilled after seasoning. It will have no soup, or broth.   8.  Jeon. Jeok (Pan-fried dish. Brochette)   - Jeon is a dish of pan-fried meats, seafood or vegetables after they have been minced or sliced and coated with wheat flour and beaten egg. Jeok is a dish of pan-fried ingredients after they have been seasoned and skewered. An example is haemul-pajeon, which is a seafood variation of the Korean pancake jeon.   9. Hoe. Pyeonyuk. Jokpyeon (Raw fish/Raw meat. Pressed meat. Pressed trotters)   - Hoe is a dish of raw meat, fish or vegetables seasoned with vinegar soy sauce, vinegar red pepper paste, or mustard. It can also be blanched in boiling water. Pyeonyuk is a dish of pressed and sliced beef or pork. Jokpyeon is a dish of long-simmered ox-head and ox-feet that is solidified and sliced.    10. Mareun-chan (Dry side dish)   - Mareun-chan is a dry side dish made of salted and seasoned meat, seafood and/or vegetables that can be stored for a long time. It is enjoyed dried or fried. Dishes such as Mareun-Squid, can also be enjoyed as a side dish for liquor.   11. Jangajji (Pickled Vegetables)   - Jangajji is a side dish of pickled vegetables that include Korean radish, cucumbers, bellflower roots and garlic in soy sauce, soybean paste or red pepper paste. It can be stored for a long time.   12. Jeotggal (Salt-fermented Seafood)   - Jeotggal is a side dish of marinated shrimp, anchovies or clams with salt that is fermented. It is served as a side dish or used as a seasoning. A popular variation is squid jeotggal.   13. Saengchae (Fresh Salad)   - Saengchae is a seasonal fresh salad dressed with vinegar soy sauce, red pepper paste or mustard. It is sweet and sour. This method of preparation is best for preserving the taste and most of the nutrition in the ingredients.   14. Kimchi (Seasoned and fermented vegetables)   - Kimchi is a dish made by marinating Korean cabbage and Korean radish with salt, seasoning it with red pepper, garlic, green onion, ginger and salt-fermented seafood, mixing it thoroughly and letting it ferment. Kimchi is the quintessential side dish in Korea. There are also many variations of kimchi, such as cucumber, lettuce or cabbage. The taste also changes, depending how long you ferment the kimchi.   ---   | Desserts |   1) Tteok (Rice Cake)   - Tteok is a dish made by steaming, frying, or boiling rice powder or other grain powder after it has been sprinkled with water. It is served at ceremonies and holidays without fail.   2) Hangwa (Korean cookies)   - Hangwa are traditional Korean cookies. There are many varieties depending on the ingredients or recipes such as yumilgwa, gangjeong, sanja, dasik, jeonggwa, suksilgwa, gwapyeon, yeotgangjeong and yeot.   3) Sikhye (Rice tea)   - Sikhye is a popular Korean dessert rice tea, and is popular in steamed saunas and jjimjilbangs.   You can check out our site for additional details and information.   Also, feel free to contact us on our SNS such as Facebook or Instagram if you have any questions or concerns about Korea.

May 21, 2019
by Harry
K-Wave, Contemporary Korea: K-Pop, K-Drama and K-Food

    When I saw Seoul officially release a new BTS Edition Discover Seoul Pass, I came to realize just how popular Korea has become globally throughout the years. Much of its success lies in the spread of Hallyu, or the K-Wave, and it is not strange today to hear tourists coming to Korea just because they love K-Pop, or they saw a K-Drama, or even after trying out some K-Food abroad. In this post, I will briefly explain some of the changes Korea had gone through regarding its globalization, and the K-Wave. I will categorize the key characteristics of K-Wave into K-Pop, K-Drama and K-Food, to make explanations and references easier. It might not be perfectly accurate, but you will get a general idea of why Hallyu has become so popular.   K-Pop  K-Pop is a recognized music genre as much as Pop, Rock or Electronic. It is characterized by repetitive, catchy, and fancy melody tunes with a catchy rhythm, and enhanced by idol performers who can dance, sing and/or even rap on stage.    (Girl group, Twice, from JYP Entertainment) It is hard to pinpoint exactly which group/singer and which period of time did K-Pop started becoming popular worldwide. Between 1995 and 1998, the three music industries JYP, SM, and YG Entertainment formed, and these industries helped to pave the way for future artists and idols to enter music industry.  Groups such as Girl's Generation (SM), Big Bang (YG) and Wonder Girls (JYP) were one of the first to start performing and promoting to fans overseas through concerts and SNS, but initially towards Asia. Songs such as "Gee", "Nobody" and later "Bang Bang Bang" became hits overseas, with overseas fans being able to cite Korean lyrics during concerts. Psy (from YG)'s "Gangnam Style" was one of the most viewed Youtube MVs throughout the world, and idol group EXO also played a huge role in spreading K-Pop especially towards the Western countries. The era of the big 3 (JYP, YG, SM) came to a hold when a certain group called BTS, from Big Hit Entertainment came to sweep, and spread K-Pop like wildfire to the US and Europe. Their songs were continuously featured on the US Billboard 200, and BTS also had won Top Artist for three years in a row on the Billboard Music Awards. It is not an exaggeration to say that global K-Pop today, is currently the era of BTS.   ---   K-Drama   Much like K-Pop, K-Drama had first spread across Asia, in regions such as Japan and China, to later spread to other parts of the world such as South-East Asia, and towards Europe and the US. The most common theme for K-Dramas is romance, often brought with dramatic conflicts and sequences that keep the audience on their toes.   One of the most influential early K-Dramas that caught the attention of Japanese, and Chinese viewers was Winter Sonata, starring Bae Yong Joon. It was so famous especially among the Japanese viewers that Bae Yong Joon got the nickname 'Yon-sama'. Other notable dramas include "My Love from the Star" and "Descendants of the Sun". These dramas helped to spark the popularity of 'chicken and beer, chimaek', the Korean army, and the culture in general. Korean movies did not gain as much popularity as K-Dramas did due to the popularity of Hollywood movies, but some notable movies worth mentioning are "The Host" (괴물) and "The Train to Busan" (부산행).     ---   K-Food   K-Food is now so much more than the common 'Kimchi' or 'Bibimbap' that were representative of Korea in the past. Rather, Korean food industries today, are focusing on spreading the Korean culture, and history throughout the food.   As much as how Japanese food, or Thai food have become globally recognized in a short period of time, Korea, and K-Food too has become globally popular through recent times.   Being a representative of slow food, healthy and dieting, K-Food, featuring healthy side dishes, and retaining its local, original tastes have become popular originating from Korean Barbeque and Kimchi.  K-Pop stars have also played a huge role in helping to promote K-Food, through promotions and K-Dramas, drawing attention to fans to try out the food.   ---   I may have missed out many details regarding K-Pop, K-Drama, or K-Food, but there are so much more innate, and correlated aspects which all helped K-Wave to build up to its popularity and significance today. There is no telling of what the future holds for K-Wave, but it seems like right now, it's just the beginning.  

May 21, 2019
by Inku
65th TOPIK (in Korea) application guide and details

The 65th TOPIK (July 7, 2019) application in Korea is open tomorrow (May 21, 2019)!   Make sure that you apply from 9:00 AM May 21, 2019 to 6:00 PM May 27 for the 65th TOPIK in Korea!   The exam will be conducted on July 7, 2019   The Results will be released on August 1, 2019   1st round of application: May 21 0900hrs ~ May 23 1800hrs 2nd round of application: May 24 1000hrs ~ May 27 1800hrs   Complete your registration and payment for 1st round of application in the given time. If you have not registered or have not made the payment in the 1st round of application, you will have to register during the 2nd round application. – the difference between 1st and 2nd round is that 1st round applicants have the benefit to choose where to take their examination and have priority. On the other hand, 2nd round applicants will have to choose from leftover spaces.   A. How to Apply: 1. Create a TOPIK account or log in to your account 2. Choose your exam location 3. Select whether you are taking TOPIK I or TOPIK II TOPIK I is for level 1 and 2 while TOPIK II is for level 3 to 6 4. Upload your photo and fill in the blanks necessary 5. Upon completion, check if your application is registered.   B. Things to take note: Make sure you upload your correct photo; you should upload a photo of you and not anyone or anything else. You are able to change your photo during the application period. However, after the application period, you will not be able to change it voluntarily. (unless you have been marked as 사진오류자(photo error). You will not be able to print your admission pass without updating your photo when marked as such. After updating your photo you should also inform that you changed your photo on [정보마당][Q&A] Any changes to your application details (other than photo) that you wish to make after the application period, you have to send your changes to the email at topik@korea.kr until July 2. Ex. Title: (접수번호/registration number)-영문성명 변경 요청 Information: HONG GIL DONG -> GO GIL DONG   If your form of identification you bring during the exam does not match the information given in the admission pass, you may not be eligible to take the exam.   C. Date to print admission pass: June 24 1000hrs ~ July 7   D. Refund date: 1st round of refund: May 21 ~ May 27 (100% refundable) 2nd round of refund: May 28 ~ June 3 (50% refundable) 3rd round of refund: June 4 ~ July 6 1300hrs (40% refundable)   E. If you have difficulties/limitations in online registration, you can visit certain facilities Time: 21 May 2019 ~ 22 May 2019 (09:00 ~ 18:00) Items to bring: Identification (alien registration card or passport) ID Photograph (or passport photo) Mode of payment (credit card or bank account) Below is the list of facilities you can receive assistance:   Name IC Contact Location 국립국제교육원 TOPIK 사업단 02-3668-1331 국립국제교육원 TOPIK 사업단(7층, 704호) 건국대학교 임철권 02-450-3956 건국대학교 언어교육원 행정실 (교내 6번 건물 1층) 한국산업기술대학교 오창열 031-8041-0802 한국산업기술대학교 시흥비즈니스센터 502호 계명대학교 남희온 053-580-6358 계명대학교(성서캠퍼스) 동영관 317호(사랑방) 부경대학교 이지은 051-629-6905 부경대학교 대연캠퍼스 국제교류부 행정실 (대학본부 108호) 선문대학교 전동호 정다운 041-559-1302 041-559-1308 선문대학교 천안캠퍼스 본관 401호 제주한라대학교 조훈진 064-741-7421 제주한라대학교 금호미래관 1층 언어교육센터 한림대학교 장윤희 033-248-2973 한림대학교 국제관 1층 14102호   Link to official TOPIK website: http://www.topik.go.kr/usr/lang/index.do?home_seq=221

May 20, 2019
by Visit Korea - Korea Tourism Organization
Culture & Traditions

About Korea: Culture & Tradition By: Korea Tourism Organization   Nowadays, if you visit the Gyeongbokgung Palace, Bukchon Hanok Village, or the Hanok Village in Jeonju, it's a common sight to see many locals and foreigners wear Hanbok. It goes to show how widespread and popular Korean culture has become throughout the world.   Korean culture is similar to Chinese, Japanese culture in that it is influenced by Confucianism, which established many traditions that we see in modern Korea today. It determines the ethical code in everyday life such as showing respect to elders and family. Hence, it is why many people ask regarding age, marriage or status to determine how to behave and treat one another in terms of social position.   ---   Hangeul:   Hangeul is one of the most unique creations of Korea, and was introduced in 1443 by King Sejong (1418-1450), the 4th king of the Joseon.  Hangeul as a written language, did not have any influence from pre-existing writing systems. The language is one of the easiest languages to learn, evidenced by Korea's illiteracy rates being one of the lowest in the world. There is even public holiday called Hangeul Day on October 9th, to commemorate and celebrate the creation of the alphabet.   ---   Hanbok, Korea's Traditional Costume   Hanbok is the traditional attire of the Korean people, which comes in various shapes and colors to reflect the culture and lifestyle during its time. Although it is only worn on special occasions and anniversaries, nowadays, hanbok is worn for fashion, and tourists find the Hanbok experience a must-do during their visit to Korea.   ---   Hansik, Traditional Korean Food   Hansik refers to Korean traditional food, centered on rice, served alongside a bowl of soup and various side dishes. Hansik is known to be extremely healthy, due to the amount based on fermented foods such as Kimchi, or Gochujang.  Some popular Korean dishes among foreigners include Bulgogi, bibimbap, and Hanjeongsik (Korean Full Table). Visitors are always treated with a little bit of everything when trying out Korean food.   ---   Hanok, Korean Traditional Housing   Hanok refers to houses built in the traditional Korean style. Hanoks can be categorized as noblemen and common-folk residences, which are characterized by the type of roof. Noblemen residences are usually tile-roofed, while common-folk residences are thatch-roofed. There are two main charms to hanoks. The first is the unique stone layered heating system of 'ondol', while the second is that hanoks are environmentally friendly, made from completely natural building materials. Today, majority of hanoks remain to commemorate Korea's past. Some have been changed in include modern facilities installed, while some remain untouched.    --- Korean Traditional Music   Korean traditional music can be divided into music listened to by the royal family, and by the common-folk, each differing greatly in style.  Jongmyo Jeryeak, is the royal ancestral ritual music, which was played during ancestral rites, and is characterized as solemn and splendid. In contrast, commoners overcame the difficulties of the working class by singing folk music, or by pansori, a traditional Korean music that narrates a themed story Recently, there has been an increase in a fusion of traditional and contemporary Korean styles of music, to feature both elements of music styles. Performances such as "Nanta" or "Gugak B-Boy" are examples of such fusions featuring traditional Korean rhythms and contemporary rock music.   Final Remarks:   Much of Korea's traditions and cultures today, have been influenced by growing globalization and western influence. Nevertheless, the Confucian influence still remains strong, and though foreigners sometimes may find it confusing, the Korean sense of belonging, social position and identity remains strong.   You can check out our site for additional details and information.   Also, feel free to contact us on our SNS such as Facebook or Instagram if you have any questions or concerns about Korea.

May 20, 2019
by Inku
How's university like in Korea?

University life in Korea   You probably have seen many videos or blogs already about the life of a Korean student. However, in this blog, I want to tell you some of the important things that you have to know as a foreign student studying in a Korean university. The purpose of this post is to give an idea of what you can expect from your university life in Korea.   Many Koreans consider University as the first step into adult life. In Korea, students enter the legal adult age as soon as they start their university year. This is when they start drinking and enjoying the nightlife. Korean parents tend to be strict until their children complete high school, but after entering university, these parents often give freedom to their children. Therefore, students have more control over their life than they ever did.   1. 동아리 Dongari Apart from the lectures and studying, students are engaged in non-curricular activities called 동아리 (dongari). This Dongari is like an active club of students with similar interests. It could be anything from sports or even looking for good food (matjib). In this Dongari, you can meet new people who are from different departments and even different universities. As for myself, I joined a photography dongari even though I had no knowledge in it. As a member of the photography dongari, we would go on field trips or events and take pictures. I joined a few other dongaris as well such as football and coding. I enjoyed the idea of meeting new people of similar interests. These dongaris are not just randomly organized groups but they go through a process of formal registration from the university. There are many Dongaris in each school and I suggest that you look into them when you are studying in a university in Korea, as they may be a big part of your university life.   2. 선배/후배 Sunbae/Hubae One of the important community culture in Korea is the 선배/후배 Sunbae/Hubae culture. In its literal sense, it is closest to senior and junior. However, it is more complicated than just that. Anyone who came first in a certain community is your Sunbae and anyone who comes next would be your Hubae. The most common analogy would be in your school. If you entered a university in 2019, the person who entered the university in the year 2018 or earlier would be your Sunbae. Anyone who enters the school at 2020 or later would be your Hubae. In the past, this Sunbae/Hubae system formed a hierarchical society. However, most of this hierarchical culture have disappeared and left a culture of socializing. Your Sunbaes tend to help you as their Sunbaes did and eventually you will be helping your Hubaes as well.   3. Drinking culture in Korea. Just like in any other universities in the world, drinking(alcohol) cannot be left undiscussed when talking about universities. It is not an overstatement to say that Koreans drink a lot. This drinking culture starts in the universities. As early as your orientation (or as Koreans call it OT), you will most likely be having something called 뒷풀이 (dwitpule). It’s like an after-party for any event. This is when people gather to drink and socialize. In these dwitpule it sometimes extends to 2차 2nd round and 3차 3rd round (or even more). While it is perfectly fine to enjoy this culture, overdrinking is a big issue in Korea and it’s always important to drink in moderation. Personally, I’m not a good drinker and I only enjoy an occasional beer. Hence, I don’t often join these dwitpule. However, it doesn’t mean that I will be left out. There are always other ways to socialize with others. If I do join for an occasional drink, I wouldn’t drink as much as others but still be able to socialize and be part of the group. Although drinking helps you socialize with more people, It’s important that you know your limit when drinking rather than drinking too much and making mistakes that you may regret.   4. 축제 Chukjae Lastly, one of the biggest events in Korean universities are 축제 (chukjae) festivals. Every year the university open these festivals around late spring or fall. The school invites various singers, groups, band etc. to perform. You can watch your favorite groups/band/singers perform live on stage for almost no cost. (Depending on the school). There are also one-day booths set up by the students that sell food and drinks as a fundraiser during these festivals. These festivals are even open to public so you are able to visit other schools as well. In my opinion, school festivals are a great way to let off some steam from studying and enjoy being a student of that school.   Describing the university culture in Korea can be endless. What I gave you above is only some of the many things that you might get to know or enjoy while studying in Korea. However, I hope that this post helped you in understanding at least some of the important university culture in Korea.

May 20, 2019