University Korean Language Programs

Category : Learning Korean / Education/Teaching
Mar 24, 2015

University Korean Language Programs

 

As more and more people decide to jump on the Korean wave, universities in the Land of the Morning Calm are expanding their growingly popular Korean language institutes. For those who want to learn a lot of Korean in a short amount of time, this is the route to take.

 

Currently, 36 universities in Korea have their own Korean language institute. People who attend these want to improve their grasp of the Korean language and prefer an intense, organized study method. Most of these Korean language students are expats working in Korea or students either here to do a degree or on exchange. Some need to learn Korean for work or school, while others just do it for fun.

 

Why Learn at a University?

Many people choose to study via alternative methods, like hiring a personal tutor, attending classes at a private language school, or through self-taught methods found online. While these may be indeed more flexible for those with strict schedules, they’re not always cheaper in the long run. While you can pay private tutors by each individual session and language academies by the month, university programs need to be paid by the semester. In that way, they may seem more expensive at first. However, when divided up by the hour, university language programs are actually much cheaper in the long run.

 

Average cost per hour of learning Korean in Korea:

University

Private Tutor

Private Language Academy Classes

Weekday

Weekend

1-on-1

5,500-8,400 KRW

25,000 KRW

19,000 KRW

35,000 KRW

60,000+ KRW

 

As well, universities will provide you with an official certificate of completion, which you could use to gain university credit or to include with future job applications.

 

Program Characteristics

Nearly all universities offer a “Regular Program” at their respective Korean language institutes. In a Regular Program, you’ll attend school for four hours (usually 9:00 to 13:00), Monday to Friday. Some schools even include field trips or cultural activities, like trying on Korean traditional clothes or making pottery. Others have free language exchange services, which will provide you with a Korean “buddy student” who will help you with Korean (and who you should help with English, of course).

 

Many schools also offer intensive winter and summer language camps. Sometimes these camps cost more to cover the additional field trips and cultural activities. The hours normally follow the same schedule as the Regular Programs (9:00 to 13:00), but there are some schools that have longer hours for their summer schools.

 

Another option for those with busy daytime schedules is taking an evening or weekend course. These classes, which are considerably less intense than their daytime counterparts, sometimes use different textbooks which are tailored to the course’s more laidback structure. Evening and weekend classes attract more of a working professional crowd, whereas the daytime ones are a bigger draw to foreign students (whose main reason for coming to Korea was to take a language program).

 

Curriculum

Curriculum at university language programs always varies based on level. Most follow the TOPIK-based system of six different levels, and you’ll be required to complete a placement test so the instructors can place you in the appropriate class. Level 1 learners have little to no knowledge of the language, while Level 6 learners can discuss complex topics like economics or philosophy freely in Korean.

 

Some larger schools, such as Sogang University, Yonsei University, or Seoul National University, have their own published textbooks that they use in class. Many smaller schools don’t, and instead use other Korean textbooks (like the “Ganada Korean” series). Some others just use textbooks from the larger universities.

 

Most supplement the in-class lessons with extra-curricular activities like talent shows, speaking contests, and icebreakers. Some activities will allow you to apply your new Korean skills first hand, such as participating in a cooking lesson or creating a short theatric performance in groups. For those who learn through doing, there’s no better way of picking up Korean.

 

The Textbook Matters!

The best way of determining whether a specific program’s teaching style will be best for you is to refer to the textbook they use. Some textbooks, such as Sogang’s, are very visual and have little to no Romanization or English translations. Others, such as the “Integrated Korean” series, include detailed English translations and explanations of linguistic concepts in each chapter. Still others, like Yonsei’s series, focus thoroughly on grammar and memorization.

 

In this way, it’s important for potential students to identify their learning styles and time constraints, then choose a program that’s best of them. For example, if you have a lot of time that you can commit to learning Korean, then Sogang’s method of immersion (learning with little use of your native language) might be best. If you struggle with language learning and don’t have a lot of time to dedicate to classes or homework, then a class that uses a straight-forward, easy to follow book like “Integrated Korean” might actually be better.

 

For More Information

  1. Universities in Korea
  2. International Student Life in Korea
  3. Types of Housing in Korea
  4. Learn Korean Independently
  5. Private Korean Language Schools
  6. Free Korean Classes and Language Exchanges

          

Universities in Seoul (17)

  • Note: Hourly tuition is based on “Regular Program” (daytime class) fees.

University

Tuition/

Hour

Phone

Website

Chung-Ang

6,750

+82-2-820-6237

http://english.cau.ac.kr

Dogguk

6,500

+82-2-2250-4563 ~7

http://iie.dongguk.edu/

Duksung

5,500

+82-2-901-8000

http://dilc.duksung.ac.kr

Ewha

7,150

+82-2-3227-3183

ile.ewha.ac.kr

Hallym

6,000

+82-02-555-4912

http://web.hallym.ac.kr

Hanyang

6,750

+82-2-220-1663

www.hyili.hanyang.ac.kr

Hongik

6,500

+82-2-320-1363

http://huniv.hongik.ac.kr/~korean/homev2/index.htm?kind=en

Hankuk

7,000

+82-2-2137-2260

builder.hufs.ac.kr

Kookmin

6,250

+82-2-910-5808

http://iie.kookmin.ac.kr

Korea U

7,900

+82-2-3290-2977

kola.korea.ac.kr

Kyunghee

7,700

+82-2-961-0081~2

eng.iie.ac.kr

Seoul National

7,900

+82-2-880-8570

language.snu.ac.kr

Sogang

7,600

+82-2-701-6692

klec.sogang.ac.kr

Sookmyung

6,250

+82-2-710-9278

lingua-express.com

SKKU

6,800

+82-2-760-1300

http://koreansli.skku.edu

U of Seoul

6,000

+82-2-6490-6672

http://kiice.uos.ac.kr

Yonsei

8,400

+82-2-2123-8550

www.yskli.com

 

Universities Outside of Seoul (14)

  • Note: Hourly tuition is based on “Regular Program” (daytime class) fees.

University

Tuition/Hour

Phone

Website

Incheon (Incheon)

5,500

+82-32-835-9851

http://www.uikorean.kr

Inha (Incheon)

6,250

+82-32-863-2930

http://site.inha.ac.kr

Ajou (Gyeonggi)

6,500

+82-31-219-1677

http://site.inha.ac.kr

Chung-Ang (Anseong)

6,250

+82-2-820-6237

http://korean.cau.ac.kr/

Hannam (Daejon)

5,600

+82-42-629-8348

http://hankls.hnu.kr/

Chonbuk (Jeolla)

6,500

+82-63-270-4479

http://lec.chonbuk.ac.kr/

Mokpo (Jeolla)

Not listed

+86-61-450-6200

http://iiee.mokpo.ac.kr/

Chonnam (Gwangju)

5,500

+82-62-530-3649

http://language.jnu.ac.kr

Changwon (Gyeonsang)

6,000

+82-55-213-2636

http://eng.changwon.ac.kr

Pukyong (Busan)

5,500

+82-51-629-6843

http://www.pknu.ac.kr

PNU (Busan)

Not listed

+82-51-510-1983~4

http://ili.pusan.ac.kr/

Pusan University of Foreign Studies (Busan)

5,500

 82-51-640-3384

http://klce.pufs.ac.kr

Kyungpook (Daegu)

Not listed

+82-53-950-6731~3

http://lang.knu.ac.kr/

Ulsan (Ulsan)

Not listed

+82-52-259-5958

http://kc.ulsan.ac.kr/

 

Tags : Language. Education.

Gabrielle interned as a Content Creator for Work'n'Play during her exchange trip to Chung-Ang University in 2012-2013. She graduated from Vancouver Island University in May 2014 with her BA in Global Studies. She is now a Master's student at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs in Ottawa, Canada. The things she misses most about her year in Korea are: going for makgeolli + jeon with friends, exploring Seoul's new and old hidden treasures and getting to practice Korean every day. You can connect with her on Twitter at @MsGabrielle or email her at gabrielle.bishop@hotmail.com.

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